The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Tue Feb 02, 2021 9:21 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Feb 02, 2021 8:10 pm
The author said:
Exactly a narrow band must be dragged around the circle
and when asked where does the band come from, he replied:
"a small constant coefficient multiplied by the circle's radius"
The data points seem not to all lie exactly on the circumference of a circle.

The 'author' probably requires them to be contained in a wider but narrow band (circular bar) with the circumference as one edge of the band (bar).

Once all the data points are within the required narrow band (bar) their circular mean can be calculated accordingly.
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Feb 02, 2021 9:42 pm

So 'bar' is used correctly here? He means something like this:
circular  bar.jpg
circular bar.jpg (226.41 KiB) Viewed 641 times

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Tue Feb 02, 2021 9:46 pm

That graphic above would be called a band, but might just about be called a deformed bar.

Your post further above contains -

... and when asked where does the band come from, he replied:
"a small constant coefficient multiplied by the circle's radius"

And that seems to be an instruction to draw another circle - either slightly bigger or slightly smaller than the original - in order to form the circular band (bar).
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

E Michael White
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Re: The English Language

Post by E Michael White » Wed Feb 03, 2021 1:30 am

John McKenna wrote:
Tue Feb 02, 2021 9:46 pm
"a small constant coefficient multiplied by the circle's radius"
This suggests to me the appropriate mathematical word is annulus. This is a shape composed of two concentric circles , with the same centre but different radii. The drawing shown is not an annulus as it has irregular shape however.

Its an interesting problem to calculate the minimum area annulus which contains scatter data especially if the position of the circles' centre is variable. If I remember correctly I've seen a solution of that about 50 years ago, using calculus of variations. I only remember reading 2 books on the subject Gelfond and Fomins book and Christoffels. However I might be mistaken; memory can play tricks.

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Thu Feb 04, 2021 10:00 am

Roger de Coverly wrote:
Tue Feb 02, 2021 7:55 pm
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Feb 02, 2021 7:39 pm
Thanks, but my question is focused on the correctness of say
a narrow bar of a circle's perimeter
You may need to give a bit more context and background.. Circumference is another word for a circle's perimeter, but where does a "narrow bar" come into it?
My guess is that the context is the probablistic and statistical analysus of a circular data distribution in the field of bioinformatics.

Perhaps the author referred to used the word 'bar' to indicate the two circular lines are needed to form a barrier within which the data points are all meant to be encompassed.

The two circles may not necessarily be concentric and in some cases might even end up looking like the graphic (see above) of the red band the author provided to the questioner.

Also, above, E Michael White speaks of a problem in pure mathematics that may be related to the question but I think we are in the realms of statistics and informatics, again.

I say 'again' because we've been around and about there before - as regards chess metrics - with Prof. Ken Regan. The main difference being that Regan ploughs his furrow alone in a small field while the huge field of bioinformatics has a great many more ploughers who can and do critique their neighbours' work using hard-earnef knowledge rather than blissful ignorance.
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Feb 06, 2021 8:14 pm

is "specialty and subspecialty hospital" a correct phrase?

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Sat Feb 06, 2021 8:31 pm

It would appear to be correct -

"A subspecialty or subspeciality (British English) is a narrow field of professional knowledge/skills within a specialty of trade, and is most commonly used to describe the increasingly more diverse medical specialties. A subspecialist is a specialist of a subspecialty.

In medicine, subspecialization is particularly common in internal medicine, cardiology, neurology and pathology, and has grown as medical practice has:
1. become more complex, and
2. it has become clear that a physician's case volume is negatively associated with their complication rate; that is, complications tend to decrease as the volume of cases per physician goes up."

However, it sounds like US nomenclature and there is also a warning -

"Subspecialty Hospitals Pose a Dilemma for Health Care"

https://www.creators.com/read/david-lip ... ealth-care
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Feb 08, 2021 7:30 am

Many thanks 😊

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Feb 16, 2021 9:29 am

What do you call babies who still drink milk? I think it cannot be 'infant', as infant covers only1 year of age.

Reg Clucas
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Re: The English Language

Post by Reg Clucas » Tue Feb 16, 2021 2:28 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Feb 16, 2021 9:29 am
What do you call babies who still drink milk? I think it cannot be 'infant', as infant covers only1 year of age.
Suckling. (assuming you mean they drink only milk). It's a bit archaic though, and is more commonly used with reference to animals, e.g. 'suckling pig'.

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Tue Feb 16, 2021 2:49 pm

Reg Clucas wrote:
Tue Feb 16, 2021 2:28 pm
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Feb 16, 2021 9:29 am
What do you call babies who still drink milk? I think it cannot be 'infant', as infant covers only1 year of age.
Suckling. (assuming you mean they drink only milk). It's a bit archaic though, and is more commonly used with reference to animals, e.g. 'suckling pig'.
The adjective 'sucking' is also defined as 'unweaned'. As in - an unweaned mammal...

"Weaning is the process of gradually introducing an infant human or another mammal to what will be its adult diet while withdrawing the supply of its mother's milk. The process takes place only in mammals, as only mammals produce milk. The infant is considered to be fully weaned once it is no longer fed any breast milk."
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Feb 19, 2021 3:10 am

Thanks

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Fri Feb 19, 2021 9:46 am

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Fri Feb 19, 2021 3:10 am
Thanks
Don't mention it.

In return a quick question for you...

Have you ever heard of either of the following Iranian correspondence (postal) chess players?

Pakdaman, Mehdi (active in the 1970s & 1980s)

Farboud, M. Ali (active in the 1960s)
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 3053
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Feb 19, 2021 1:37 pm

John McKenna wrote:
Fri Feb 19, 2021 9:46 am
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Fri Feb 19, 2021 3:10 am
Thanks
Don't mention it.

In return a quick question for you...

Have you ever heard of either of the following Iranian correspondence (postal) chess players?

Pakdaman, Mehdi (active in the 1970s & 1980s)

Farboud, M. Ali (active in the 1960s)
No, but I can ask around for you

John McKenna
Posts: 4450
Joined: Tue May 17, 2011 2:02 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Fri Feb 19, 2021 2:31 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Fri Feb 19, 2021 1:37 pm
John McKenna wrote:
Fri Feb 19, 2021 9:46 am

SNIP

In return a quick question for you...

Have you ever heard of either of the following Iranian correspondence (postal) chess players?

Pakdaman, Mehdi (active in the 1970s & 1980s)

Farboud, M. Ali (active in the 1960s)
No, but I can ask around for you
Thanks, but no need to go out of your way to do that.

Pakdaman became an ICCF International Master in 1971 and received the ICCF's Silver Bertl von Massow Medal in 1984.

Farboud not only played postal (correspondence) chess he also played for Iran in FIDE Olympiads in the early 1960s.

The 1960's, '70s & 80s were a long time ago and not many players in Iran may be able to remember them.

By the way, 'suckling' can be used as a noun (e.g. she was carrying a suckling) as well as an adjective, however, 'unweaned' is not used as a noun, only as an adjective (e.g. she was carrying an unweaned infant).
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

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