The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Dec 18, 2020 5:34 am

What's the difference between
fundamental issues
and
fundamental problems?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Dec 18, 2020 7:36 am

What's the difference between
the most alike position
and
the most similar position?

Andy Stoker
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Re: The English Language

Post by Andy Stoker » Fri Dec 18, 2020 9:18 am

fundamental issues and fundamental problems?

A problem could generally be called an issue - but not all issues are problems.

Is this from Obama's book again? I suppose a fundamental issue could be access to health care for all, ambition to live to one's potential, enjoyment of education ...but these "issues" are goals, ambitions, targets - positive things. (The problems are the barriers to achieving them)

Fundamental problems could be American's love affair with guns, disenfranchisement of people who are not white, deep-rooted inequalities of wealth and opportunity, sexual exploitation.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sun Dec 20, 2020 11:57 am

Andy Stoker wrote:
Fri Dec 18, 2020 9:18 am
fundamental issues and fundamental problems?

A problem could generally be called an issue - but not all issues are problems.

Is this from Obama's book again? I suppose a fundamental issue could be access to health care for all, ambition to live to one's potential, enjoyment of education ...but these "issues" are goals, ambitions, targets - positive things. (The problems are the barriers to achieving them)

Fundamental problems could be American's love affair with guns, disenfranchisement of people who are not white, deep-rooted inequalities of wealth and opportunity, sexual exploitation.
No, I submitted the part of the book I was to translate .
It's from an academic paper on time series.

Mike Gunn
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Re: The English Language

Post by Mike Gunn » Sun Dec 20, 2020 2:08 pm

Problems require solutions.

Issues are there to be discussed.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Dec 21, 2020 5:03 pm

Thanks.
What's the difference between "early effort" and "early efforts"?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Dec 29, 2020 7:52 am

What's the difference between 'toward' and 'towards'?

Reg Clucas
Posts: 440
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Re: The English Language

Post by Reg Clucas » Tue Dec 29, 2020 2:08 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Dec 29, 2020 7:52 am
What's the difference between 'toward' and 'towards'?
https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-a ... ards-usage

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Dec 30, 2020 11:12 am

Thanks.

Which one is correct?
The part of A most similar to B
or
The most similar part of A to B

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Feb 02, 2021 2:47 pm

Which one is correct?
The relative concept of time
The relative characteristic of time
or the relativity of time
?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Feb 02, 2021 3:15 pm

What would
the mean of the data points in a narrow bar of a circle’s perimeter
mean?

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Tue Feb 02, 2021 5:07 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Feb 02, 2021 3:15 pm
What would
the mean of the data points in a narrow bar of a circle’s perimeter
mean?
Your question is not so much about the English language it is more about the language of mathematics.

For a start you could simply think of it as finding the mean of a series of times (e.g. 01:00, 05:00, O9:00, 13:00, 19:00, and 23:00 ) on a clock face (see end of first quote, below.)

There is no proper answer to your question tbat does not involve more mathematics than meets the eye because -

"In mathematics, a mean of circular quantities is a mean which is sometimes better-suited for quantities like angles, daytimes, and fractional parts of real numbers. This is necessary since most of the usual means may not be appropriate on circular quantities.

For example, the arithmetic mean of 0° and 360° is 180°, which is misleading because for most purposes 360° is the same thing as 0°.]

As another example, the "average time" between 11 PM and 1 AM is either midnight or noon, depending on whether the two times are part of a single night or part of a single calendar day..." (Wikipedia)

An example is given -

"A simple way to calculate the mean of a series of angles (in the interval [0°, 360°)) is to calculate the mean of the cosines and sines of each angle, and obtain the angle by calculating the inverse tangent.

Consider the following three angles as an example: 10, 20, and 30 degrees. Intuitively, calculating the mean would involve adding these three angles together and dividing by 3, in this case indeed resulting in a correct mean angle of 20 degrees.

By rotating this system anticlockwise through 15 degrees the three angles become 355 degrees, 5 degrees and 15 degrees. The naive mean is now 125 degrees, which is the wrong answer, as it should be 5 degrees..."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mean_of ... quantities
Last edited by John McKenna on Tue Feb 02, 2021 9:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Feb 02, 2021 7:39 pm

Thanks, but my question is focused on the correctness of say
a narrow bar of a circle's perimeter

Roger de Coverly
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Re: The English Language

Post by Roger de Coverly » Tue Feb 02, 2021 7:55 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Feb 02, 2021 7:39 pm
Thanks, but my question is focused on the correctness of say
a narrow bar of a circle's perimeter
You may need to give a bit more context and background.. Circumference is another word for a circle's perimeter, but where does a "narrow bar" come into it?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Feb 02, 2021 8:10 pm

The author said:
Exactly a narrow band must be dragged around the circle
and when asked where does the band come from, he replied:
"a small constant coefficient multiplied by the circle's radius"

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