Chess history trivia

Historical knowledge and information regarding our great game.
Roger de Coverly
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Roger de Coverly » Sat Dec 09, 2023 9:38 pm

John Townsend wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2023 8:09 pm
The variation may be weak - but it's immortal.
I rather think it's this one as described by Joe Gallagher.
Gallagher (1992) states "Basically, White sacrifices a piece and castles into a raging attack, but according to theory, he miraculously holds the balance. Nevertheless, I still advise you to steer well clear of it."

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MJMcCready
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by MJMcCready » Sat Dec 09, 2023 10:11 pm

Christopher Kreuzer wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2023 7:41 pm
MJMcCready wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2023 6:01 pm
That's a tough question.
I've gone through the Falkbeer, Muzio and several other variations (e.g. Schallopp). There are a surprising number of variations in the King's Gambit. No luck so far.
I'd be curious to know how long it was in vogue. Quite some time I would say.

Jon D'Souza-Eva
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Jon D'Souza-Eva » Sat Dec 09, 2023 10:26 pm

John Townsend wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2023 8:34 pm
Yes, Jon, very good. For the Immortal Game, see Edward Winter's fine article:
https://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/immortal.html
I'd forgotten about that framed chess set at Simpson's-in-the-Strand which was vandalised to add Keene's name to the list of chess greats.

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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Sat Dec 09, 2023 10:38 pm

Roger de Coverly wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2023 9:38 pm
John Townsend wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2023 8:09 pm
The variation may be weak - but it's immortal.
I rather think it's this one as described by Joe Gallagher.
Gallagher (1992) states "Basically, White sacrifices a piece and castles into a raging attack, but according to theory, he miraculously holds the balance. Nevertheless, I still advise you to steer well clear of it."
I like what Emanuel Lasker said (quoted from the material collated by Edward Winter):
“Skittle” playing, as recreation, has a useful function to perform. But, if chess is to be treated as literature, then it is incumbent that the games that are published shall be the product of much thought, of deep imagination, of a sentiment of truth; and above all that the players shall be imbued with a feeling of responsibility, such as follows from tournament or match play.

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Sun Dec 10, 2023 10:26 am

Thomas Jefferson Bryan is to be seen in the famous Marlet painting of the St. Amant v. Staunton match in Paris. He is sitting to the right of Staunton. He was the author of a pamphlet about the match.

The following year, when Staunton fell ill in Paris, Bryan accommodated him for several weeks at his home.

A portrait of Bryan as a young man, by Thomas Sully, can be seen here as part of an article by Rebecca Affenita:

https://medievalartus.ace.fordham.edu/e ... -first-for

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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Sun Dec 10, 2023 11:32 am

John Townsend wrote:
Sun Dec 10, 2023 10:26 am
Thomas Jefferson Bryan is to be seen in the famous Marlet painting of the St. Amant v. Staunton match in Paris. He is sitting to the right of Staunton. He was the author of a pamphlet about the match.

The following year, when Staunton fell ill in Paris, Bryan accommodated him for several weeks at his home.

A portrait of Bryan as a young man, by Thomas Sully, can be seen here as part of an article by Rebecca Affenita:

https://medievalartus.ace.fordham.edu/e ... -first-for
He was so proud and protective over his collection that he did not hire any employees. Instead, Bryan took care of the day to day operations of the gallery himself.
Reminds me (in an indirect way) of some of the larger chess history collections!

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Matt Mackenzie
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Sun Dec 10, 2023 4:10 pm

Jon D'Souza-Eva wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2023 10:26 pm
John Townsend wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2023 8:34 pm
Yes, Jon, very good. For the Immortal Game, see Edward Winter's fine article:
https://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/immortal.html
I'd forgotten about that framed chess set at Simpson's-in-the-Strand which was vandalised to add Keene's name to the list of chess greats.
Has he ever tried to justify that?
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Mon Dec 11, 2023 10:47 am

A former prime minister announced that an earl had declined the presidency of the British Chess Association, but that a poet had accepted the honour. Who declined?

Jon D'Souza-Eva
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Jon D'Souza-Eva » Mon Dec 11, 2023 12:28 pm

John Townsend wrote:
Mon Dec 11, 2023 10:47 am
A former prime minister announced that an earl had declined the presidency of the British Chess Association, but that a poet had accepted the honour. Who declined?
The poet must be Alfred, Lord Tennyson and the former prime minster Sir Robert Peel. There were so many famous people involved with British chess at the time! Were either John Ruskin or Randolph Churchill earls? I'll have to take a look at wikipedia to find out.

Jon D'Souza-Eva
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Jon D'Souza-Eva » Mon Dec 11, 2023 1:35 pm

The only Earl I can find who might have been offered the post of President of the British Chess Association is Richard Dawson. However is seems he actually was the President between 1884 and 1885. Perhaps he was offered it in 1883 but declined and Lord Tennyson was President for a year from 1883?

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Mon Dec 11, 2023 2:15 pm

Earl of Dartrey (Richard Dawson) is correct. He declined the honour in 1885 (having previously been both President and Vice-President), and Lord Tennyson was elected President. The announcement was made by Sir Robert Peel.

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Thu Dec 14, 2023 7:49 am

Which British player introduced a variation of the Queen's Gambit and had his analysis published shortly before the outbreak of World War II, but died overseas during the war?

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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Thu Dec 14, 2023 9:22 am

John Townsend wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2023 5:36 pm
St. George's Chess Club. It was founded in 1840 as an immediate consequence of the demise of Howard Staunton's Westminster Chess Club. In 1851, it was host to the first international tournament.
I failed to confirm that John was (of course) correct! Back to the current question (sort of).

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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Thu Dec 14, 2023 9:28 am

John Townsend wrote:
Thu Dec 14, 2023 7:49 am
Which British player introduced a variation of the Queen's Gambit and had his analysis published shortly before the outbreak of World War II, but died overseas during the war?
I have abjectly failed to find the answer here, but while looking...

Which chess player, who came to Britain as a young child and died in London in the Second World War, led a team that played a consultation game against a team led by Alekhine?

(I need to come up with better questions!)

David McAlister
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by David McAlister » Thu Dec 14, 2023 9:31 am

John Townsend wrote:
Thu Dec 14, 2023 7:49 am
Which British player introduced a variation of the Queen's Gambit and had his analysis published shortly before the outbreak of World War II, but died overseas during the war?
Arthur Reynolds. The article appeared in B.H. Wood's Chess magazine (April 1939). He died "in Asian waters" on 29th November 1943.

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